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  #1  
Old 10-28-2008, 08:33 PM
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Default Outlook For RN's 2008-2009

U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

As the largest health care occupation, registered nurses held about 2.5 million jobs in 2006. Hospitals employed the majority of RNs, with 59 percent of jobs. Other industries also employed large shares of workers. About 8 percent of jobs were in offices of physicians, 5 percent in home health care services, 5 percent in nursing care facilities, 4 percent in employment services, and 3 percent in outpatient care centers. The remainder worked mostly in government agencies, social assistance agencies, and educational services. About 21 percent of RNs worked part time.

Overall job opportunities for registered nurses are expected to be excellent, but may vary by employment and geographic setting. Employment of RNs is expected to grow much faster than the average for all occupations through 2016 and, because the occupation is very large, many new jobs will result. In fact, registered nurses are projected to generate 587,000 new jobs, among the largest number of new jobs for any occupation. Additionally, hundreds of thousands of job openings will result from the need to replace experienced nurses who leave the occupation.

Employment change. Employment of registered nurses is expected to grow 23 percent from 2006 to 2016, much faster than the average for all occupations. Growth will be driven by technological advances in patient care, which permit a greater number of health problems to be treated, and by an increasing emphasis on preventive care. In addition, the number of older people, who are much more likely than younger people to need nursing care, is projected to grow rapidly.

Employment is expected to grow more slowly in hospitals—health care’s largest industry—than in most other health care industries. While the intensity of nursing care is likely to increase, requiring more nurses per patient, the number of inpatients (those who remain in the hospital for more than 24 hours) is not likely to grow by much. Patients are being discharged earlier, and more procedures are being done on an outpatient basis, both inside and outside hospitals. Rapid growth is expected in hospital outpatient facilities, such as those providing same-day surgery, rehabilitation, and chemotherapy.
More and more sophisticated procedures, once performed only in hospitals, are being performed in physicians’ offices and in outpatient care centers, such as freestanding ambulatory surgical and emergency centers. Accordingly, employment is expected to grow very fast in these places as health care in general expands.
Employment in nursing care facilities is expected to grow because of increases in the number of elderly, many of whom require long-term care. However, this growth will be relatively slower than in other health care industries because of the desire of patients to be treated at home or in residential care facilities, and the increasing availability of that type of care. The financial pressure on hospitals to discharge patients as soon as possible should produce more admissions to nursing and residential care facilities and to home health care. Job growth also is expected in units that provide specialized long-term rehabilitation for stroke and head injury patients, as well as units that treat Alzheimer’s victims.
Employment in home health care is expected to increase rapidly in response to the growing number of older persons with functional disabilities, consumer preference for care in the home, and technological advances that make it possible to bring increasingly complex treatments into the home. The type of care demanded will require nurses who are able to perform complex procedures.
Rapid employment growth in employment services industry is expected as hospitals, physician’s offices, and other health care establishments utilize temporary workers to fill short-term staffing needs. And as the demand for nurses grows, temporary nurses will be needed more often, further contributing to employment growth in this industry.

Job prospects. Overall job opportunities are expected to be excellent for registered nurses. Employers in some parts of the country and in certain employment settings report difficulty in attracting and retaining an adequate number of RNs, primarily because of an aging RN workforce and a lack of younger workers to fill positions. Enrollments in nursing programs at all levels have increased more rapidly in the past few years as students seek jobs with stable employment. However, many qualified applicants are being turned away because of a shortage of nursing faculty. The need for nursing faculty will only increase as many instructors near retirement. Many employers also are relying on foreign-educated nurses to fill vacant positions.
Even though overall employment opportunities for all nursing specialties are expected to be excellent, they can vary by employment setting. Despite the slower employment growth in hospitals, job opportunities should still be excellent because of the relatively high turnover of hospital nurses. RNs working in hospitals frequently work overtime and night and weekend shifts and also treat seriously ill and injured patients, all of which can contribute to stress and burnout. Hospital departments in which these working conditions occur most frequently—critical care units, emergency departments, and operating rooms—generally will have more job openings than other departments. To attract and retain qualified nurses, hospitals may offer signing bonuses, family-friendly work schedules, or subsidized training. A growing number of hospitals also are experimenting with online bidding to fill open shifts, in which nurses can volunteer to fill open shifts at premium wages. This can decrease the amount of mandatory overtime that nurses are required to work.
Although faster employment growth is projected in physicians’ offices and outpatient care centers, RNs may face greater competition for these positions because they generally offer regular working hours and more comfortable working environments. There also may be some competition for jobs in employment services, despite a high rate of employment growth, because a large number of workers are attracted by the industry’s relatively high wages and the flexibility of the work in this industry.
All four advanced practice specialties—clinical nurse specialists, nurse practitioners, nurse-midwives, and nurse anesthetists—will be in high demand, particularly in medically underserved areas such as inner cities and rural areas. Relative to physicians, these RNs increasingly serve as lower-cost primary care providers.

Median annual earnings of registered nurses were $57,280 in May 2006. The middle 50 percent earned between $47,710 and $69,850. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $40,250, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $83,440.

http://www.bls.gov/oco/print/ocos083.htm
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Old 10-29-2008, 06:40 AM
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You know, this is very similar to here, except that I don't have facts and figures.

One thing I didn't see mentioned, and yet is to me, very important, is the higher risk of litigation that staff and institutions will face, considering that patients will probably be even more acute.

So it would make sense, in order to attract younger ppl into the profession as us mainstay oldies leave it, to improve working conditions, and hopefully ratio of staff per patients taking acuity into account.
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Old 10-29-2008, 10:58 AM
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The problem here in America is not so much attracting young students to the profession, but 1) allowing them in to programs and 2) paying teachers enough to teach.

Nursing is my second degree. I graduated the first go around with my degree in Psychology. I returned to nursing school 2 years later and did not have much support from fellow nurses. Some of the nurses I worked with supported me and taught me all the way through, they are still my life long friends. However, I had others who told me I wouldnt make it and Bs were unacceptable. I needed to strive for As. This was at my school and at my job (I had worked through nursing school in a hospital). I was so proud when I passed my NCLEX and when I, the B student, was given a job at one of the country's best cancer instiutions. I threw my degree in their faces. I think the schools and fellow nurses need to be more supportive of those really looking to join the profession.

I love to teach! LOVE IT! I am debating what to do with my future and would like to advance my career. I would love to teach, however, there simply isnt money in it. I can have my education totally paid for, but at my current position I would make more than a professor. Its ashame that it has to be this way because I know so many how could benefit from experienced RNs to teach them. I work with great intelligent nurses who I learn from everyday.

As for me, I am still not sure what my future holds --- I am toying with NP or CNS. Maybe one day when I pay off all of my other education debts!
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Old 10-29-2008, 06:19 PM
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I think that's true here too. But so many nurses get sick of bedside nursing, not because of the job, but because of the way we are treated. Burnout...
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Old 10-29-2008, 10:57 PM
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I think this election will define a great deal of what our future holds. I can recall the time that RN's were wooed with new cars, huge cash incentives and down payments on homes to commit to contracts at facilities.

Then a few years later I had friends that were new grads who had to take graveyard shifts and commute for an hour or more just to get their foot in the door of a facility to get a job.

It does not seem to make a diff if you have a MSN or are a diploma RN, it's getting to be more of "who you know" rather that what you know. I'm not worried. I never did let it keep me up at night.

I've worked registry all my career and have seen the ups and downs. I know there are times when you have to be flexible and that is one reason I thank my stars I never specialized in one area.

I have friends who have only worked in L and D and they are getting downsized like crazy. Too terrified of the prospect of transitioning into med surg or any other unit.

I say, hang onto your hats because the next 12 months are going to reflect a lot of things. Health care is going to change no matter who gets elected and the need for nurses is going to get tricky. Keep your options open, be adaptable and keep your skills current.

Just a hunch.
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