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Old 10-29-2010, 10:27 AM
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Default Pregnancy as a disorder??

Ok, that was a weird title, but I swear that's how one pregnant nurse at work treats it. She's one of about five preggies right now, and the only one who is "too delicate" to do actual work. She won't take isolation patients (contact iso people, not airborne, and universal precautions won't sway her). She won't lift more than ten pounds (keep in mind she's about five months along, so hardly unable to bend and move). She won't boost at ALL, even if it's a 95 pound L.O.L. and the other person boosting is doing most of the hauling. She can't work her scheduled shifts (too demanding) so management is trying to work with her on doing half-shifts and "helping hands" the rest of the time...yeah, that's working out well....who do you think is picking up her patient loads after four hours??

And on and on. The other preggies are at various stages of pregnancy (but less "done" than she is) and we wonder how much longer before they all become too delicate too. Don't want to get an admission? Just put your hand on your abdomen, sigh, and when someone asks if you're ok, say "oh, probably. Maybe. I'm not sure....." until someone offers to do some of your work for you.

It's sickening.

And management is getting tired of it, they say, but no one wants to seem like they are "picking on her" for being pregnant ( legalities and all) but the fact is she's being lazy and it's pissing off anyone who's ever worked while more than a little pregnant (and still managed TO work). The only people who seem unfazed by it are the ones who will probably become pregnant later this year! (heck, it's starting to look like a good segue into retirement LOL)
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Old 10-29-2010, 12:32 PM
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I hope you print my post and give it to her anonymously!

I do living history, and 'back then', women would be pregnant, maybe have 2 others hanging on their skirts, lugging water, doing chores, washing clothes by hand and hanging them up! Oh, and cast iron pots are NOT light! After I broke my arm, I asked my Ortho when I could start lifting a pot for rehab. He said 'take it easy, but it would eventually help.'

I say that the BS of her being 'delicate' is a crock, and I'd believe it ONLY if she had a triple signed paper by 3 MD's. Move yer assets, honey!
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Old 10-29-2010, 02:15 PM
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I think I remember something when I was pregnant about there being some kind of heavy lifting restriction. I think in my prenatal book they recommended not more than 25 lbs? But still -- you can do a lot with 25 lbs. Boosting, helping people OOB is totally fine. It is NOT disabled, you just need to be a little more careful. I believe my facility makes sure you can lift 50 lbs during their pre-employment physical, for comparison. If you use common sense and don't overdo it though, a pregnant woman should be fine being a bedside nurse. I never had my doctor write me a note re: a lifting restriction.

I worked up until the last minute with both of my pregnancies. I took a full load and did 12 hour shifts. My first pregnancy, I was new and low on the seniority list, and I worked a ton of nights. I was on days when I was in my 39th week, worked an 8 hour shift on Friday, and went into labor at 2 AM Saturday morning. My second I was working days. I remember I had some HORRIBLE patients -- this one guy with an open abdomen with dead bowel stands out. I remember gagging behind the clove-oiled surgical mask it smelled so bad, especially to my oversensitive pregnant nose.

Pregnancy is not a disability. Special treatment is not required. There are a handful of things that you need to stay away from that are harmful to a fetus (radiation, obviously, and there are a couple of bad bugs) but for ALMOST everything, universal precautions is perfectly ok.

Is this lady a first time mom? I would bet yes. She's gonna learn soon that pregnancy is a cakewalk compared to the first year of a baby's life. There's nothing like coming in at 7 AM after getting 3 hours of broken sleep because you've been up breast-feeding, diapering, rocking your 4 month old ... day, after day, after day. The sleep deprivation that happens the first 4-6 months IMO is way worse than anything pregnancy hands you.
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Old 10-29-2010, 03:27 PM
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I didn't have a job when I was pregnant, but I did all the housework, walked all over the neighborhood to do shopping for groceries and such, and just about did the things I'd usually do. And, Cheshire, you're right about the first year. Shoshana couldn't latch on properly to breast feed, so that fiasco ended up causing me a a bad case of mastitis, which I ignored until I started running a fever and vomiting. I ended up in the ER for an I&D, took one of the pain pills they gave me, went home, and was making supper a few hours later.

I hope little miss I-have-the-vapors can grow up and learn to land on her own two feet. Motherhood isn't easy, but, if you manage to survive the worst of it, you'll have a perfect right to feel like you've really accomplished something, and you'll be stronger for it.
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Old 10-29-2010, 03:34 PM
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Yes, she's a first-time mom. And I am really having a hard time picturing her dealing with a newborn--the lack of sleep, crying jags that you sometimes just can't fix, breastfeeding issues. She's got the kind of hubby who runs and does and runs again when she "feels lightheaded" (yes, she does that silly thing) and needs to sit down and rest for a couple of hours.

Can't wait until hubby is out, the baby is hysterical, and she can't drop onto her haunches and "rest" until the noise goes away.

Cheshire, I wish I had the guts to print out your post and stick it on the medroom door! It would be enough to make all the bellyaching and bitching disappear, imo.
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Old 10-29-2010, 10:13 PM
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Whose crying jags, hers or the baby's?
I can still remember looking at the stufff I had brought home from the hospital and coming across a pamphlet with a picture of a baby and the words, "I love you" under the picture. I burst into tears and said, "How can she love me? I'm a horrible mother." Shoshana was about 6 days old at the time, hardly enough time for me to mess up her life with what I felt were my poor maternal skills, but that's what hormones (or the lack of them) can do to you.
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