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Old 11-18-2010, 04:58 PM
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Default Nursing professor says she was fired for refusing to use ethics textbook

Suit says ethnic stereotypes in nursing textbook

1:49pm EST
By Barbara Liston

ORLANDO, Florida (Reuters) - Do many African Americans tend to be high-keyed, animated, confrontational and interpersonal? Are men of Japanese heritage presumed incapable of managing their day-to-day affairs? Are Cubans particularly sexually attracted to the overweight?

A former nursing professor at the University of Central Florida says she was fired in 2008 after refusing to use a textbook, "Guide to Culturally Competent Health Care" by Larry Purnell and Betty Paulanka, containing descriptions like these. The book is part of the required curriculum.

Grant Heston, spokesman for UCF, told Reuters the university had not yet been served with a lawsuit but believes the allegations are without merit.

"The book is one of the best-selling publications about nursing cultural trends in the country, and it won the American Journal of Nursing book award in 2005.

Co-author Purnell also stood by the basic truth of the book's descriptions.
"Culture is very sensitive. The statement may be true but that doesn't mean they like it," Purnell said, adding, "It's true for the group, not for the individual."

Other allegations of cultural stereotypes in the book the suit cites include: most Haitians don't respect clock time or value punctuality; the Irish have difficulty expressing feelings; German adolescents are encouraged to wear robes over pyjamas and the cleanliness and order of a Greek home traditionally reflects the moral character of the woman.

Paulanka said the sections describing each racial, ethnic or cultural group were written by either a recognized expert or a native of the culture.

http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE6AH4OO20101118
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Old 11-18-2010, 05:35 PM
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The Irish have difficulty expressing their feelings? Don't ever get into a fight with one of us.
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Old 11-18-2010, 05:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Poliopioneer View Post
The Irish have difficulty expressing their feelings? Don't ever get into a fight with one of us.

My thoughts exactly, Mim.... My Irish Grammy told me once "If you don't want to know the answer, don't ask an Irish person the question."

But, I have a question here.... I thought the professors were permitted to choose their own textbooks? There are at IUP.
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Old 11-18-2010, 06:10 PM
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Old 11-18-2010, 07:06 PM
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^^^What they all said. In addition, have they never heard the phrase "get my Irish up??"

IDK, I think this is a lot of fuss about nothing. Yes, it is stereotypical to a degree. Reality check here: sometimes stereotypes are true. And sometimes they aren't. Nurse-lings (and nurses continuing their education) need to learn about individual variation. I just had to take my own culture and religion course. The college I attend chose to develop their own guide. Here's paragraph one, page one:

"The information in this document is basic and should not be strictly applied to everyone who claims to be of the same religion and culture."

It's a GUIDE, not the end all be all. Just like with medical guidelines, we need to use our critical thinking skills to decide what's appropriate to your consumer. Think about it: AHA guidelines recommend the use of ASA in persons who are at high risk for heart disease, but obviously you aren't going to start passing ASA to someone with a documented allergy.

Hope this makes sense...I'm kinda fried.
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Old 11-18-2010, 07:33 PM
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[SIZE=<div id=]^^^What they all said. In addition, have they never heard the phrase "get my Irish up??"

Oh yeah, there is that.... add the dose of stubbornness, the red hair, and the green eyes, and there's me all over... in spades... Irish to the core...

And don't forget the big mouth....
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Old 11-18-2010, 08:03 PM
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Now a days, the correct term is "cultural sensitivity" and/or "cultural humility." I am a doctoral student at UC San Francisco, which is actually one of the top international graduate nursing programs in the world...we don't say "cultural competence" there.

Now, we really CAN say anything we want...it is San Francisco after all...but when it comes to respect for culture, the new thinking it that it is arrogant to assume one is "competent" when it comes to another person's culture.

So, my personal and humble opinion is that THAT professor was ahead of her time.th_4285
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Old 11-18-2010, 10:14 PM
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The fact that people are so different is a never-ending source of amazement to me, and I believe that when something is different, it is also potentially interesting. Maybe that's why I never made it past an Associates' degree; I wanted to study and learn about so many things, I couldn't pick one thing to stay with.

Right now, I live in an apartment building which has a higher black population than white, and we all get along fine. We're not afraid to ask each other questions, or discuss the differences in the way we do things (hair styling, for one example), and we learn from each other. We're also old enough and tired enough to not go around looking for a reason to fight with each other. We're more likely to fight for each other, if necessary.

Re: knowledge of other cultures in nursing, I think that the more that can be learned, the better. How many nurses working in L&D have expressed concern over the fact that an Orthodox Jewish husband will not touch his wife after she gives birth? The reason lies in the very strict laws regarding a menstruating (or, in this case, lochia-producing) wife. A simple gesture that we consider ordinary may, to someone else, be considered very rude. And the list goes on. I don't know if I care for the text that was mentioned, though.
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Old 11-19-2010, 06:32 AM
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OMG...this is my alma mater (BSN, UCF, '91) !!!!

Don't know the players, though....it has been almost 20 years since I graduated.
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