Go Back   Just Us Nurses! A Forum for Nurses. Learn, Share, Discuss, Conversate. The Choice is Yours. Join Us Today! > Nursing Today > General Nursing Discussions

User Tag List

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 02-23-2010, 06:55 PM
DutchgirlRN's Avatar
Owner/Administrator
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 7,923
Thanks: 3,899
Thanked 7,713 Times in 4,409 Posts
My Mood:
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 2 Thread(s)
Default ICU Patient Gain From Team Approach to Care


MONDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Intensive care patients are less likely to die if they're looked after by a multidisciplinary health care team that includes doctors, nurses, respiratory therapists, clinical pharmacists and others, says a new study.
Researchers analyzed data from more than 107,000 patients admitted to intensive care units at 112 acute care hospitals in the United States between 2004 and 2006. The risk of death was lower among patients in ICUs where a multidisciplinary team conducted daily rounds.
The lowest risk of death was among patients at the 22 (19.6 percent) hospitals that had a trained intensivist physician who consulted on or managed all ICU cases as well as daily rounds conducted by a multidisciplinary care team.
Care by a multidisciplinary team may reduce the risk of death among ICU patients for a number of reasons, said Michelle M. Kim, of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, and colleagues.
"Multidisciplinary rounds may facilitate implementation of best clinical practices, such as evidence-based treatments for acute lung injury, sepsis and prevention of ICU complications," they wrote. "Pharmacist participation on rounds is associated with fewer adverse drug events and alone may be associated with lower mortality among ICU patients. Multidisciplinary rounds may also improve communication between health care providers."
The findings may influence how hospitals look after ICU patients, who are often at high risk of death from conditions such as sepsis and acute lung injury.
"Based on these results and expert opinion voiced in consensus guidelines, it is reasonable for hospitals to implement routine multidisciplinary rounds when staffing capabilities allow," Kim and colleagues wrote. "Our study shows that hospitals without the ability to implement high-intensity physician staffing can still achieve significant mortality reductions by implementing a multidisciplinary, team-based approach."
The study appears in the Feb. 22 issue of the journal Archives of Internal Medicine.
__________________
Send a private message to DutchgirlRN


Joanna MSN, APRN, FNP-BC

Reply With Quote Go to top
Nursing Forum, Nursing Education, Nursing School, Nursing Chat, Nursing Bulletin Board, Nursing Vent, RN, LPN
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:27 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.2.4 (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.



Search only trustworthy HONcode health websites:

     
//-->