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Old 11-14-2015, 12:19 PM
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Default Vaccinations

So I have been assigned to research an immunization that children are required to have. Any suggestions?

I was thinking of doing the flu shot (she said that that would be acceptable, even though it is technically a vaccination). Especially since there always seems to be controversy surrounding this one, in particular.

ETA: Title should technically be immunizations. Oh, well.
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Old 11-14-2015, 01:40 PM
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Originally Posted by cracklingkraken View Post
So I have been assigned to research an immunization that children are required to have. Any suggestions?

I was thinking of doing the flu shot (she said that that would be acceptable, even though it is technically a vaccination). Especially since there always seems to be controversy surrounding this one, in particular.

ETA: Title should technically be immunizations. Oh, well.
I would start with the CDC web site followed by your local public health.
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Old 11-14-2015, 03:44 PM
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If you have to pick just one I would pick the HPV vaccine since it is the most controversial vaccine. On the next post I've included some information on the HPV vaccine but you can find much more info by Googling. Love Google!

wwww.cdc.com
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Old 11-14-2015, 03:55 PM
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Since the above schedule was posted the HPV vaccine has come to the forefront. Here is information about the HPV vaccine. Of course every child should receive an annual flu vaccine as well.

Q: Who should get HPV vaccine?

A: All kids who are 11 or 12 years old should get the three dose series of HPV vaccine. Teen boys and girls who did not get the vaccine when they were younger should get it now. Young women can get HPV vaccine through age 26, and young men can get vaccinated through age 21. The vaccine is also recommended for gay and bisexual young men (or any young man who has sex with men) and also for young men with compromised immune systems (including HIV) through age 26, if they did not get HPV vaccine when they were younger.

Q: Why is the vaccine recommended at such a young age?

A: For HPV vaccines to be effective, they should be given prior to exposure to HPV. There is no reason to wait until a teen is having sex to offer HPV vaccination to them. Preteens should receive all three doses of the HPV vaccine series long before they begin any type of sexual activity and are exposed to HPV. Also HPV vaccine produces a higher immune response in preteens than it does in older teens and young women.

Q: Is the vaccine still effective if you have had sexual intercourse?

A: Even if someone has already had sex, they should still get HPV vaccine. While HPV infection usually happens soon after someone has sex for the first time, a person might not be exposed to any or all of the HPV types that are in the vaccine; males and females in the age groups recommended for vaccination are likely to get at least some protection from the vaccine.

Q: Should boys get HPV vaccine too?

A: Yes. This vaccine helps prevent boys from getting infected with the types of HPV that can cause cancers of the throat, penis and anus. The vaccine also prevents genital warts. When boys are vaccinated, they are less likely to spread HPV to their current and future partners. Talk with your son’s doctor about which HPV vaccine is right for him

Q: How well does HPV vaccine work?

A: The HPV vaccine works extremely well. Clinical trials showed the vaccines provided close to 100% protection against precancers and, for Gardasil 4 and 9, genital warts. Since the vaccine was first recommended in 2006, there has been a 56% reduction in HPV infections among teen girls in the US, even with very low HPV vaccination rates. Research has also shown that fewer teens are getting genital warts. In other countries such as Australia where there is higher HPV vaccination coverage, HPV vaccine has also reduced the number of cases of precancers of the cervix in young women in that country. Also, genital warts decreased dramatically in young women and men in Australia since the HPV vaccine was introduced.

Q: How long will the HPV vaccine last?

A: Protection provided by HPV vaccine should be long-lasting. Data from clinical trials and ongoing research show that HPV vaccine lasts in the body for at least 10 years without becoming less effective. There is no evidence to suggest that HPV vaccine loses the ability to provide protection over time.

Q: Will the vaccine require a booster?

A: Currently in the US, there are three shots in the HPV vaccine series that are given over six months; there are no booster doses recommended. Like all vaccines, HPV vaccine is continually monitored to make sure that it remains safe and effective. If protection from HPV vaccine doesn’t last as long as it should, then the Advisory Committee for Immunization Practice would review the data and determine if a booster should be recommended.

Q: Does someone have to restart the HPV vaccine series if too much time passes between the shots?

A: It is recommended that all three shots of the HPV vaccine series be given over six months; the second shot should be given one to two months after the first, and the third dose should be given six months after the first dose. However, if someone waits longer than that between shots, they do not need to restart the series. Even if has been months or years since the last shot, the series should still be completed.

http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd-vac/...aqs.htm#safety

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Old 11-14-2015, 04:32 PM
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Thank you!

TBH, I don't know too much about the HPV vaccine (or that there was that much controversy), so I think I'll go with that.

I love doing research papers. Especially ones that are applicable to a lot of people.
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Old 11-15-2015, 12:34 AM
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Be prepared for a swamp of insanity. The antivaxers claim HPV vaccine has a huge adverse-effect rate and that it's killed dozens of people, while some misguided religious types don't want to give it to their kids because it will "promote promiscuity." My head goes in search of a banging wall every time I hear that.
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Old 11-15-2015, 12:45 AM
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The antivaxers claim HPV vaccine has a huge adverse-effect rate
The antivaxers claim huge adverse-effects with every vaccine I haven't heard the one about kids dying from it, just that parents think it gives their kids permission to have sex at age 11. My daughter has herpes and wasn't sexually active until she was 17. Married at 25. I wish the vaccine had been available when she was 11 years old.

When I did my peds clinical we had got a favorable response from parents of young both girls and boys when suggesting the HPV. I don't remember any "no's" but I do remember some saying they would have to read up on it first. We had booklets to give the parents.
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Old 11-15-2015, 12:48 AM
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The first vaccine against human papillomavirus, or HPV, which causes cervical cancer, came out five years ago. But now it has become a hot political topic, thanks to a Republican presidential debate in which candidate Michele Bachmann inveighed against "innocent little 12-year-old girls" being "forced to have a government injection."

Behind the political fireworks is a quieter backlash against a public health strategy that has won powerful advocates in the medical and public health community.
It appears this vaccine gets people riled up because it involves sex and 11-year-old girls.
The two approved vaccines, Gardasil and Cervarix, are designed to protect against a sexually transmitted virus. That's why Julie Stewart was shocked when the pediatrician said her 11-year-old Sophie should get it.

"My daughter is so not sexually active that it seems very premature to even think about protecting her from cervical cancer," Stewart says.
Stewart says she tends to have faith in doctors, so she pondered why she reacted that way.
"I realize it's probably more about my squeamishness with the thought of her becoming sexually active than the vaccination itself," she says. "It's not the science. I think it's my own issues around her developing sexually."

Stewart lives in Washington, D.C., which requires the vaccine for middle-school girls. Virginia is the only other place to mandate it. Both allow opting out with a doctor's note. Dozens of other states are debating whether to mandate the vaccine.

The Case For Fighting Cervical Cancer

Many find the public health case for HPV vaccination compelling. Cervical cancer strikes about 12,000 U.S. women a year and kills around 4,000. Strong backers of the vaccine include the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Academy of Family Physicians and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The vaccine requires three shots over six months and costs upwards of $400, which is not always covered by insurers or government agencies.

Milwaukee pediatrician Rodney Willoughby, a designated spokesman for the American Academy of Pediatrics, says there's a very good reason for the big push to get preteen girls vaccinated. The idea is to get it done well before their first sexual encounter.
"This is being timed just before you start to have those discussions about the birds and the bees," Willoughby says.

Studies done before widespread HPV vaccination show that by the time they're 15, nearly 10 percent of American girls are infected with HPV. By age 17, that has doubled to nearly 20 percent.
Some research also indicates that many parents are clueless about when their children start having sex.
Ninety-five percent of women who are infected with HPV never, ever get cervical cancer. It seemed very odd to be mandating something for which 95 percent of infections never amount to anything.

Dr. Diane Harper, professor at the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine

"Ideally none of our children is going to be sexually active until they meet Mr. Right or Mr. Wrong, and that's the end of the story," Willoughby says. "But it happens, and sometimes you're not aware of it. And we can't prevent [HPV infection] once that exposure's occurred."
Willoughby says his daughter will get the vaccine next year, when she turns 11.


HPV Vaccine: The Science Behind The Controversy : NPR
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Old 11-18-2015, 10:32 AM
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I agree with the article in that it seems parents aren't uneasy about the science, but about their girls becoming sexually active. But - it seems like a worthwhile investment. I'm sure many parents do imagine their girls growing up and getting married - so hey - why not protect against a yes, unlikely, but possible awful thing that could happen? If the government already requires a nice list of vaccines, it shouldn't be such a big deal to add one to the list...
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Old 11-18-2015, 10:43 AM
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I can understand parents not wanting their young daughters not to become sexually active, but it does happen. And what about rape? That happens, too, and it's bad enough without having to also worry about contracting a preventable disease on top of it.
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